The Biden administration’s AI plans: what to expect


I suspect we will see OSTP focus on technological responsibility under his leadership, which will be particularly relevant to artificial intelligence issues such as facial recognition, algorithmic bias, data privacy, corporate influence. about research and the myriad of other questions I write about in The Algorithm.

Finally, Biden’s new Secretary of State has made it clear that technology will remain a significant geopolitical force. during his confirmation hearing in the Senate, Antony Blinken noted that there is “a growing divide between techno democracies and techno autocracies. Whether techno-democracies or techno-autocracies are the ones that define the way technology is used … will go a long way in shaping the coming decades. As pointed out by Politico, this is very clearly an allusion to China and the idea that the United States is in a race with the country to develop emerging technologies like AI and 5G. Dave Gershgorn of OneZero reported by 2019 that it had become a rallying cry in the Pentagon. Speaking at an AI conference in Washington, Trump’s Defense Secretary Mark Esper framed the tech race “in dramatic terms,” ​​Gershgorn wrote: “A future of global authoritarianism or of global democracy.

Blinken’s comments suggest to me that the Biden administration will likely continue this Trump administration thread. This means he can continue to put export controls on sensitive AI technologies and place bans Chinese tech giants to do business with US entities. It is possible that the administration will invest more in the construction of the The high-tech manufacturing capabilities of the United States in an attempt to disentangle its AI chip supply chain from China.

Correction: Jack Clark is the former policy director of OpenAI.

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